Bail Bonds Blog and Resources

How To Tell Your Boss You Were Arrested

Boss learning of his employee's arrest

In the past we discussed whether or not you have to inform your employer that you were arrested. What we concluded was that, if you were arrested on some minor offense and quickly released, it’s pretty much up to you whether you tell the boss. However, if you were arrested on a more serious charge and are facing the possibility of a trial and real jail time, or you are being held for arraignment and are going to miss work, you’ll have to call the boss. And the sooner the better. But there’s a right way and a wrong way to inform your boss that you’ve been arrested. Below we’ll go over the right way.

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How NOT to Act if You’re Being Arrested

Arrested? Here's what NOT to do.

No one wants to be arrested. It’s traumatic, disruptive, inconvenient as hell and could turn out to cost you a lot of money and leave a stain on your reputation. But it happens. Often when we least expect it. When situations escalate and it suddenly becomes clear the police are going to slap the cuffs on you there is a right way to act and a wrong way to act. If you want to make it hard for the bail bonds agent to obtain your release you’ll act the wrong way. If you want to be back home ASAP you’ll act the right way. Below we’ll go over how NOT to act if you’re facing arrest or have been arrested.

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Colorado Learns a Valuable Lesson About So-Called Bail Reform

Colorado Voted Bail Bond Reform Into Effect

With so many Americans incarcerated and more than 10 million arrested each year it’s no wonder that politicians, desperate to grab hold of an issue they think will resonate with voters, have glummed onto bail reform. The bail system is an easy target for a number of reasons.

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Do I Have to Tell My Employer That I Am Out On Bail?

 Do I Have to Tell My Employer That I Am Out On Bail?

When people get arrested it creates all kinds of ripples in their life. Not only may they be facing charges that could disrupt their life and the lives of their loved ones for years, but even if the charges are not terribly serious there could still be fallout that causes damage to personal and professional relationships. One of those is the relationship between the arrested person and their employer. A lot of people wonder just what are their obligations when it comes to informing the company they work for that they were arrested and are now out on bail. Do they have to tell them at all? If they don’t tell them will the city or state notify their employer? Will the bondsman call their boss and tell them what happened? It’s all very confusing but below we’ll try and shed some light on this topic.

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Five Good Reasons to Always Use RR Bail Bonds

Bail Bondsmen Help Provide the Keys to Freedom

Getting arrested is one of the most stressful, disorienting experiences a person can have. In the blink of an eye their nice, predictable world full of friends, family, life and love is turned upside down. They’re taken against their will, confined against their will and face charges that could potentially impact their life for years to come. And while the American system of justice is based on the presumption of innocence it sure doesn’t feel that way when the cell door closes. But that’s why we have bail. Bail ensures that those accused of a crime are able to return to their daily life while they await their court appearance. And the bondsman plays a key role in securing their release. There are those however, who suggest that, if possible, you should always pay your own bail rather than using a bonding agent. But is that really the best thing to do?

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Habeas Corpus and Bail

Lincoln's Suspension of Habeas Corpus Remains Controversial To This Day

The bail bonding system stretches back at least to 13th century England where it took root as a way to protect the rights of people against the overzealous actions of the crown. The powers that be at that time were not above simply imprisoning people they saw as potential threats to their reign. The bail system evolved in response to those kinds of abuse. It ensured a person would be allowed to return home while awaiting their day in court as long as they ponied up a certain amount of cash or collateral. That cash or collateral would then be forfeited if they failed to appear and face the charges against them. The system, while not perfect, has been a bulwark against unjust incarceration for some 800 years.

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