Bail Bonds Blog and Resources

Do I Have to Tell My Employer That I Am Out On Bail?

 Do I Have to Tell My Employer That I Am Out On Bail?

When people get arrested it creates all kinds of ripples in their life. Not only may they be facing charges that could disrupt their life and the lives of their loved ones for years, but even if the charges are not terribly serious there could still be fallout that causes damage to personal and professional relationships. One of those is the relationship between the arrested person and their employer. A lot of people wonder just what are their obligations when it comes to informing the company they work for that they were arrested and are now out on bail. Do they have to tell them at all? If they don’t tell them will the city or state notify their employer? Will the bondsman call their boss and tell them what happened? It’s all very confusing but below we’ll try and shed some light on this topic.

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Five Good Reasons to Always Use RR Bail Bonds

Bail Bondsmen Help Provide the Keys to Freedom

Getting arrested is one of the most stressful, disorienting experiences a person can have. In the blink of an eye their nice, predictable world full of friends, family, life and love is turned upside down. They’re taken against their will, confined against their will and face charges that could potentially impact their life for years to come. And while the American system of justice is based on the presumption of innocence it sure doesn’t feel that way when the cell door closes. But that’s why we have bail. Bail ensures that those accused of a crime are able to return to their daily life while they await their court appearance. And the bondsman plays a key role in securing their release. There are those however, who suggest that, if possible, you should always pay your own bail rather than using a bonding agent. But is that really the best thing to do?

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Habeas Corpus and Bail

Lincoln's Suspension of Habeas Corpus Remains Controversial To This Day

The bail bonding system stretches back at least to 13th century England where it took root as a way to protect the rights of people against the overzealous actions of the crown. The powers that be at that time were not above simply imprisoning people they saw as potential threats to their reign. The bail system evolved in response to those kinds of abuse. It ensured a person would be allowed to return home while awaiting their day in court as long as they ponied up a certain amount of cash or collateral. That cash or collateral would then be forfeited if they failed to appear and face the charges against them. The system, while not perfect, has been a bulwark against unjust incarceration for some 800 years.

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Can a Bounty Hunter Cross State Lines to Pursue a Fugitive?

Bounty Hunters Scott Gribble and Steve Krause After Catching Two Fugitives

Bounty hunters are one of the least understood and at the same time, most misunderstood components of the criminal justice system. They’re often thought of as independent wheeler dealers who hang around at the post office reading wanted posters and then enter bars with guns blazing in search of outlaws. But the fact is that in almost every instance the bounty hunter is hired by the bail bonding agent to help track down a defendant who has skipped bail and fled. Many fugitives and would-be fugitives are aware they may wind up with a bounty hunter on their tail. But a large percentage of these ne’er do wells believe they can evade capture if they flee to another state. Is that the case?

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Bounty Hunter or Skip Tracer: What’s the Difference?

Skip Tracing - Increasingly Popular for Fugitive Recovery

When a person is granted bail it comes with one massive condition attached: you must appear at the specified date to face the charges against you. Everyone ever released on bail throughout history has agreed to this condition. Unfortunately some people agree to that condition but then head for the hills as soon as they’re released. When this happens their bail is revoked and they are considered fugitives. The bondsman (who will be in for a prolonged fight to try and recoup his losses from the fugitive’s relatives) hires a bounty hunter to locate and return the fugitive to jail, where he will sit until it’s time for his court appearance. At least, that’s how it used to work.

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Infographic of the Bail Bond Process

We've created this Infographic to help explain the bail bonds process.

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